Catherine Robinweiler leads the class during a lab session at Edmonds College on April 29. (Kevin Clark / Herald file)

Catherine Robinweiler leads the class during a lab session at Edmonds College on April 29. (Kevin Clark / Herald file)

Way to go

Edmonds College was selected to advise the development of a national infection control curriculum in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Edmonds College will collaborate with 15 other institutions to update and standardize infection control training in both community colleges and health care facilities.

Director of Nursing Kyra McCoy said education is essential to infection control. Problems typically arise because of a lack of training or a failure to follow procedures.

“We already know what works in infection control, we just need to reinforce it,” McCoy said. “Just like how you need to renew your CPR certification, healthcare professionals need to retrain in infection control.”

The education initiative was launched through a partnership between the American Hospital Association, the League for Innovation in the Community College, and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The league awarded the college $30,000 to support the involvement of nursing faculty Catherine Robinweiler and Zerai Asgedom in the project.

The nursing program offers a distinct perspective because of its early adoption of hybrid coursework that combines in-person and online learning.

“The hybrid format allows us to serve a more diverse audience,” McCoy said. “There are so many intelligent care providers out there, we just need to give them access to education.”

Sandy Atkinson, conservation chairperson for the Evergreen Fly Fishing Club, hands Ardi Kveven, executive director of the ORCA program at Everett Community College, a check to help with the program’s marine research. (Evergreen Fly Fishing Club)

Sandy Atkinson, conservation chairperson for the Evergreen Fly Fishing Club, hands Ardi Kveven, executive director of the ORCA program at Everett Community College, a check to help with the program’s marine research. (Evergreen Fly Fishing Club)

ORCA gets some help from Fly Fishing club

The Evergreen Fly Fishing Club recently announced it is sponsorship of the Everett Community College ORCA (Ocean Research College Academy) eDNA sampling project this summer.

“Due to the seed money EFFC has provided, we are pioneering sampling for eDNA in Possession Sound,” said said Ardi Kveven, executive director of the program. “With multiple collaborators, we are testing the sampling methods and processing for organisms that have passed through the water column in the Possession Sound region. While we are most interested in plankton presence, we look forward to seeing many different species.”

ORCA uses the local marine environment as the unifying theme for all academic disciplines. Using an innovative, project-based approach in a small “learning community” environment, students enjoy the challenge of designing and implementing their own learning experiences under the guidance of talented college faculty.

The Evergreen Fly Fishing Club includes over 100 members and provides fly fishing educational programs and activities for its members, serves as a venue for interaction of fly fishers in Snohomish County, and promotes the conservation of fishery resources. It was founded in 1955, is a non-profit organization and is affiliated with the Fly Fishers International Organization, as well as one of its founding member clubs.

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