Isabella Breda

Ian Terry / The Herald

From a research boat on Wednesday, Oct. 12, Tulalips Tribes treaty rights commissioner Terry Williams points out a steep hillside near Mission Beach that has been gradually eroding for years.

Photo taken on 10122016

Terry Williams, Tulalip’s ‘champion of climate issues,’ dies at 74

The bolo tie-wearing elder shaped state and national environmental policy. He was both soft-spoken and a powerful advocate.

Ian Terry / The Herald

From a research boat on Wednesday, Oct. 12, Tulalips Tribes treaty rights commissioner Terry Williams points out a steep hillside near Mission Beach that has been gradually eroding for years.

Photo taken on 10122016
Teenagers tube the waters of the Pilchuck River Wednesday afternoon in Snohomish, Washington on July 20, 2022. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Heat wave to be a scorcher, especially for inland Snohomish County

Officials share tips on how to beat the heat, prevent fires and stay safe at your favorite swimming hole.

Teenagers tube the waters of the Pilchuck River Wednesday afternoon in Snohomish, Washington on July 20, 2022. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Edmonds Mayor Mike Nelson (left) and Brett Bass. Photos by Olivia Vanni and Andy Bronson

After court strikes Edmonds gun storage law, city looks at options

Those options may be limited to voluntary programs, rather than enforcement of a city ordinance that went further than state law.

Edmonds Mayor Mike Nelson (left) and Brett Bass. Photos by Olivia Vanni and Andy Bronson
Kristiana Johnson

Edmonds Councilmember Kristiana Johnson, 70, dies

Others on the City Council learned of her death in an email Monday. “She was a one-of-a-kind person,” one councilmember said.

Kristiana Johnson
Inside the Edmonds Library that is currently under renovation after water damage from a burst pipe on Friday, July 15, 2022 in Edmonds, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Waterlogged library stays shuttered indefinitely in Edmonds

A burst water pipe wreaked catastrophic damage, but most books were unscathed. A reopening plan is set to be released next month.

Inside the Edmonds Library that is currently under renovation after water damage from a burst pipe on Friday, July 15, 2022 in Edmonds, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
A child rides their bike past the Frontier Heights Park playground on Friday, July 15, 2022 in Lake Stevens, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Serious upgrades coming to Lake Stevens’ Frontier Heights Park

Design is underway to add a labyrinth, as well as pickleball courts and fields for soccer and baseball.

A child rides their bike past the Frontier Heights Park playground on Friday, July 15, 2022 in Lake Stevens, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Photos and mementos of Andrew Fryberg hang on the wall inside his mothers home on Wednesday, July 13, 2022 in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

‘It’s a start’: 8 years later, MPHS families see step toward gun control

The Marysville Pilchuck shooting turned parents into advocates in 2014. The Tulalip chair was invited to D.C. as Biden touted a new bill.

Photos and mementos of Andrew Fryberg hang on the wall inside his mothers home on Wednesday, July 13, 2022 in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Kinect @ Lynnwood is an example of housing around the incoming light rail stations. (Contributed)

Bracing for light rail, Lynnwood City Council grapples with growth

In 2012, councilmembers laid the groundwork for the arrival of the Link. Some big changes are still about a decade out.

Kinect @ Lynnwood is an example of housing around the incoming light rail stations. (Contributed)
The “Village of Hope,” a tiny home community including 17 shelters, is set to open on Mission Hill Road in Tulalip in September. (Tulalip Tribes)

Tulalip Tribes to open tiny home village with 17 shelters

It’s called the Village of Hope. Monthly culture nights will feature classes in Lushootseed and “Tulalip cooking.”

The “Village of Hope,” a tiny home community including 17 shelters, is set to open on Mission Hill Road in Tulalip in September. (Tulalip Tribes)
Tulalip council members and tribal members watch as Governor Jay Inslee signs bill HB 1571 into law at the Tulalip Resort on Thursday, March 31, 2022 in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Washington launches new Indigenous missing person alert system

It’s similar to an Amber Alert. Tulalip families of the missing have called the program a good first step.

Tulalip council members and tribal members watch as Governor Jay Inslee signs bill HB 1571 into law at the Tulalip Resort on Thursday, March 31, 2022 in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
The Tulalip Tribes have joined state and local leaders in calling on residents to stay home when not performing certain essential activities. Six Tulalip Tribes members had tested positive for COVID-19, including a tribal elder who died of the disease, according to the tribes. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Tulalips say US Supreme Court ruling undermines tribal sovereignty

Justice Brett Kavanaugh wrote: “Indian country is part of the State, not separate from the State.”

The Tulalip Tribes have joined state and local leaders in calling on residents to stay home when not performing certain essential activities. Six Tulalip Tribes members had tested positive for COVID-19, including a tribal elder who died of the disease, according to the tribes. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Laura Johnson, left, and Susan Paine.

After Roe ruling, Edmonds to consider abortion rights measure

A proposed resolution would direct police not to investigate people seeking or providing abortions.

Laura Johnson, left, and Susan Paine.
Traffic moves along Avenue D in Snohomish next to an open space that could be used for MFTE housing Snohomish is considering adding to the new Midtown District. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Snohomish weighs tax breaks for affordable homes, though results vary

Other Snohomish County cities say the tax exemption has spurred some growth, but not much, and at a cost.

Traffic moves along Avenue D in Snohomish next to an open space that could be used for MFTE housing Snohomish is considering adding to the new Midtown District. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Young girls watch as a canoe carrying an enormous king salmon makes its way to shore on Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

‘Keep your Indian alive’: After decades of outlawed culture, a Tulalip revival

Government-sanctioned boarding schools scarred Indigenous children for life. In turn, their children and grandchildren have suffered inherited trauma. But those harmed by the Tulalip Indian School, a cornerstone of the Tulalip Reservation since its inception, have begun to heal.

Young girls watch as a canoe carrying an enormous king salmon makes its way to shore on Saturday, June 11, 2022, in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Rev. Eugene Casimir Chirouse, pictured here holding a cross at front right in 1865, founded a boarding school for Indigenous students on Tulalip Bay. It became one of the first religious schools in the country to receive a federal contract to educate Indigenous youth, with the goal of assimilation. (Courtesy of Hibulb Cultural Center)

Unearthing the ‘horrors’ of the Tulalip Indian School

The Tulalip boarding school evolved from a Catholic mission into a weapon for the government to eradicate Native culture. Interviews with survivors and primary documents give accounts of violent cultural suppression under the guise of education at the “Carlisle of the West,” modeled after the notorious Carlisle Indian Industrial School.

Rev. Eugene Casimir Chirouse, pictured here holding a cross at front right in 1865, founded a boarding school for Indigenous students on Tulalip Bay. It became one of the first religious schools in the country to receive a federal contract to educate Indigenous youth, with the goal of assimilation. (Courtesy of Hibulb Cultural Center)
Indigenous children from around the Pacific Northwest were forced by the U.S. government to attend the Tulalip Indian School. (Tulalip Tribes Hibulb Cultural Center)

‘Genocide our people survived’: Tulalip school fueled generations of pain

Growing up in the Tulalip boarding school, Harriette Shelton Dover would “just sit absolutely still and watch my playmates die” of illness, hunger and cold. The Daily Herald dug into rosters and other records at Tulalip that reveal a staggering death toll — and pain passed from generation to generation.

Indigenous children from around the Pacific Northwest were forced by the U.S. government to attend the Tulalip Indian School. (Tulalip Tribes Hibulb Cultural Center)
Matthew War Bonnet, 76, of Snohomish, attended St. Francis Indian School in South Dakota from 1952 to 1960. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Survivor’s story: Snohomish man, 76, lives with boarding school trauma

“We were always hungry,” said Matthew War Bonnet Jr., 76, who was forcibly taken to the St. Francis Indian School in the 1950s.

Matthew War Bonnet, 76, of Snohomish, attended St. Francis Indian School in South Dakota from 1952 to 1960. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Candy Hill-Wells, funeral services officer for the Tulalip Tribes, tries to read the weathered letters on a grave marker Tuesday, June 14, 2022, at Priest Point Cemetery in Tulalip, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Mysteries of boarding school era linger at Tulalip graveyards

Over 30 children are buried at Priest Point and Mission Beach. But dozens of plots from the boarding school era are nameless.

Candy Hill-Wells, funeral services officer for the Tulalip Tribes, tries to read the weathered letters on a grave marker Tuesday, June 14, 2022, at Priest Point Cemetery in Tulalip, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
The city of Lynnwood is planning to purchase the Goodwill to build a park. Photographed on June 21, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Lynnwood set to buy Goodwill for $8M, making way for city center park

In less than a decade, the thrift store site could become a bustling urban park near a light rail station.

The city of Lynnwood is planning to purchase the Goodwill to build a park. Photographed on June 21, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Junelle Lewis, right, daughter Tamara Grigsby and son Jayden Hill sing “Lift Every Voice and Sing” during Monroe’s Juneteenth celebration on Saturday, June 18, 2022. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Rainy Juneteenth celebrations in Snohomish, Monroe mark progress

Community members say they hope their cities can continue to “build on what has begun.”

Junelle Lewis, right, daughter Tamara Grigsby and son Jayden Hill sing “Lift Every Voice and Sing” during Monroe’s Juneteenth celebration on Saturday, June 18, 2022. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)