Tulalip

Tulalip board members, along with Randy Johnson and Johnny Avello cut a ribbon at the Tulalip DraftKings Sportsbook grand opening on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2022 in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Place your bets: Seattle sports legends ring in new Tulalip sportsbooks

With fanfare and two Hall of Fame guests, the Tulalip Tribes are the latest tribe to offer sports betting in their casinos.

 

Members of the Tulalip Tribes perform a blessing and acknowledgement at the dedication of the replacement bronze plaque for the 1855 treaty between local tribes and the U.S. government in Mukilteo, Washington on September 9, 2022. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Mukilteo ceremony dedicates replica of stolen treaty plaque

The focus Friday was moving forward, with respect to a past deemed as unjust, as exemplified by the 1855 Treaty of Point Elliott.

 

Firefighters transported one patient with life-threatening injuries after a single-vehicle fatality crash in the area of Lager Lane and Turk Road shortly after 7:30 a.m. on Tuesday. (Marysville Fire District)

Tulalip teen charged with driving high in fatal crash

Daisha Smith-Spencer was ejected from the bed of a truck that her friend was reportedly driving in March. She was 20.

 

Replacement Point of Elliot Treaty marker on Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2022 in Mukilteo, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Mukilteo restores stolen plaque at site of fateful Point Elliott Treaty

The Tulalip Tribes chair said it “would’ve been nice” if Mayor Joe Marine consulted with the tribes to make the plaque more “appropriate.”

Replacement Point of Elliot Treaty marker on Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2022 in Mukilteo, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
People wander through the DraftKings Sportsbook during the soft opening at the Tualip Casino on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022 in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Just as MLB, NFL seasons overlap, Tulalip Tribes open sportsbooks

At Tulalip’s new sportsbooks run by DraftKings, wagers can be made on Seahawks and Mariners games, but not the Huskies or Cougars.

People wander through the DraftKings Sportsbook during the soft opening at the Tualip Casino on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022 in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
A conference room decorated with a mural will host support groups at the Tulalip Tribes' medication-assisted treatment facility. Misty Napeahi led a tour in Tulalip, on Aug. 23. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Tulalip Tribes opening methadone clinic ‘to try to prevent death’

The clinic will serve tribal members and the general public. It represents a shift in how Tulalip approaches drug treatment.

A conference room decorated with a mural will host support groups at the Tulalip Tribes' medication-assisted treatment facility. Misty Napeahi led a tour in Tulalip, on Aug. 23. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Heritage High Principal Dr. Nathan Plummer and Tulalip Education Division Executive Director Jessica Bulstad stand out front at Heritage High School on Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022, in Marysville, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Marysville school’s new approach embraces ‘Indigenous ways of learning’

Educators are redesigning Heritage High’s education model to support Indigenous students in a culturally competent way.

Heritage High Principal Dr. Nathan Plummer and Tulalip Education Division Executive Director Jessica Bulstad stand out front at Heritage High School on Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022, in Marysville, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Andrew Gobin of the Tulalip Tribes greets members of NOAA before the playing of a welcome song during a ceremony Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, at the decommissioned NOAA building on the waterfront in Mukilteo, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Ahead of demolition, tribes lament loss of Mukilteo research center

The spot “has huge importance to us,” one Tulalip tribal official said. Now, its future is largely up to the Port of Everett.

Andrew Gobin of the Tulalip Tribes greets members of NOAA before the playing of a welcome song during a ceremony Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, at the decommissioned NOAA building on the waterfront in Mukilteo, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
The Tulalip Tribes have joined state and local leaders in calling on residents to stay home when not performing certain essential activities. Six Tulalip Tribes members had tested positive for COVID-19, including a tribal elder who died of the disease, according to the tribes. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Tulalip lawyer: Native rights at risk in pending SCOTUS decision

Months after a state ruling on Washington’s Indian Child Welfare Act, the U.S. Supreme Court could soon upend federal law.

The Tulalip Tribes have joined state and local leaders in calling on residents to stay home when not performing certain essential activities. Six Tulalip Tribes members had tested positive for COVID-19, including a tribal elder who died of the disease, according to the tribes. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Pallbearers guide elder Terry Williams’ flag-draped casket outside at the conclusion of a memorial service for Williams on Saturday, July 30, 2022, at the Tulalip Gathering Hall in Tulalip, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

‘Way ahead of all of us’: Mourners remember Tulalip’s environmental champion

Hundreds flocked to the Tulalip Gathering Hall to reflect on the life of Terry Williams, who died last month at 74.

Pallbearers guide elder Terry Williams’ flag-draped casket outside at the conclusion of a memorial service for Williams on Saturday, July 30, 2022, at the Tulalip Gathering Hall in Tulalip, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Top row: Anita Azariah (left), Bert Johnson, Daryl Williams, Gary Kemp and Julio Cortes. Middle row: Bernard Moody. Bottom row: June Robinson (left), Christopher D. Elliott, David Wiley, Mark James and Mary Fosse.

2 open seats create intriguing primaries in 38th Legislative District

The usual issues are at play. Meanwhile, the Senate race has an intraparty primary contest.

Top row: Anita Azariah (left), Bert Johnson, Daryl Williams, Gary Kemp and Julio Cortes. Middle row: Bernard Moody. Bottom row: June Robinson (left), Christopher D. Elliott, David Wiley, Mark James and Mary Fosse.
Ian Terry / The Herald

From a research boat on Wednesday, Oct. 12, Tulalips Tribes treaty rights commissioner Terry Williams points out a steep hillside near Mission Beach that has been gradually eroding for years.

Photo taken on 10122016

Terry Williams, Tulalip’s ‘champion of climate issues,’ dies at 74

The bolo tie-wearing elder shaped state and national environmental policy. He was both soft-spoken and a powerful advocate.

Ian Terry / The Herald

From a research boat on Wednesday, Oct. 12, Tulalips Tribes treaty rights commissioner Terry Williams points out a steep hillside near Mission Beach that has been gradually eroding for years.

Photo taken on 10122016
Logo for news use featuring the Tulalip Indian Reservation in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118

Man dead after crash into Tulalip ravine

The man’s truck was found over a 100-foot enbankment. He died from his injuries. Police continued to investigate.

Logo for news use featuring the Tulalip Indian Reservation in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Photos and mementos of Andrew Fryberg hang on the wall inside his mothers home on Wednesday, July 13, 2022 in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

‘It’s a start’: 8 years later, MPHS families see step toward gun control

The Marysville Pilchuck shooting turned parents into advocates in 2014. The Tulalip chair was invited to D.C. as Biden touted a new bill.

Photos and mementos of Andrew Fryberg hang on the wall inside his mothers home on Wednesday, July 13, 2022 in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
A group gathers near a blending pit, which is where cow waste and other biodegradable material begins its journey towards becoming energy in a digester Friday, June 17, 2022, in Monroe, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Cow pie power! Monroe manure-to-energy project expands

Qualco has been turning cow poop into electricity since 2008. A new generator could turn on by mid-August.

A group gathers near a blending pit, which is where cow waste and other biodegradable material begins its journey towards becoming energy in a digester Friday, June 17, 2022, in Monroe, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
The “Village of Hope,” a tiny home community including 17 shelters, is set to open on Mission Hill Road in Tulalip in September. (Tulalip Tribes)

Tulalip Tribes to open tiny home village with 17 shelters

It’s called the Village of Hope. Monthly culture nights will feature classes in Lushootseed and “Tulalip cooking.”

The “Village of Hope,” a tiny home community including 17 shelters, is set to open on Mission Hill Road in Tulalip in September. (Tulalip Tribes)
Chris Rutland and son Julian buy fireworks from the Big House of Boom stall at Boom City on Thursday, June 30, 2022 in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

At Tulalip’s Boom City, fireworks are a family tradition

Generations have grown up at the Fourth of July institution. “Some people make good money, some are just out here for the pastime.”

Chris Rutland and son Julian buy fireworks from the Big House of Boom stall at Boom City on Thursday, June 30, 2022 in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Jenson Hankins address the court during his resentencing at the Snohomish County Courthouse on Thursday, June 30, 2022 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Man gets reduced sentence for 2003 Marysville ambush murder

“I’ve wanted to apologize for a long time,” said Jenson Hankins, who was 16 when he killed John Jasmer near Marysville.

Jenson Hankins address the court during his resentencing at the Snohomish County Courthouse on Thursday, June 30, 2022 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Tulalip council members and tribal members watch as Governor Jay Inslee signs bill HB 1571 into law at the Tulalip Resort on Thursday, March 31, 2022 in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Washington launches new Indigenous missing person alert system

It’s similar to an Amber Alert. Tulalip families of the missing have called the program a good first step.

Tulalip council members and tribal members watch as Governor Jay Inslee signs bill HB 1571 into law at the Tulalip Resort on Thursday, March 31, 2022 in Tulalip, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
The Tulalip Tribes have joined state and local leaders in calling on residents to stay home when not performing certain essential activities. Six Tulalip Tribes members had tested positive for COVID-19, including a tribal elder who died of the disease, according to the tribes. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Tulalips say US Supreme Court ruling undermines tribal sovereignty

Justice Brett Kavanaugh wrote: “Indian country is part of the State, not separate from the State.”

The Tulalip Tribes have joined state and local leaders in calling on residents to stay home when not performing certain essential activities. Six Tulalip Tribes members had tested positive for COVID-19, including a tribal elder who died of the disease, according to the tribes. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)