Julie Titone

Tom Campbell, who as a legislative staffer, helped write the original 1990 Growth Management Act, stands in the  eco-friendly subdivision called Clearwater Commons on Tuesday, March 9, 2021 in Bothell, Washington. House Bill 1099, which would update Washingtonճ Growth Management Act, moves to the Senate after House approval. Campbell wants Snohomish County to move ahead with climate-friendly regulations, in parallel if not ahead of updated state law. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Bill would add climate-change factors to state planning law

Backers say HB 1099 would limit sprawl and cut greenhouse gases. Critics fear it would hurt housing options.

 

Dirt is moved during the deconstruction of a seawall on Friday, Jan. 29, 2020 in Langley, Wa. Shoreline restoration underway north of Langley involves removal of an old barge and bulkheads. Sea level rise makes such habitat improvements all the more important to endangered salmon and their prey. The project is a partnership between Seahorse Siesta property owners and the Northwest Straits Foundation. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Small fish, big barriers: A county confronts climate change

Island County has 196 miles of shoreline to protect as sea levels rise. And erosion is only one of the challenges.

 

Marianne Edain, seen with her dog Takilna, is a longtime activist and, with her husband Steve Erickson, founded the Whidbey Environmental Action Network (WEAN). They are restoration ecologists by trade. Shot at home on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021 in Clinton, Washington. Edain, 73, has been fighting local environmental battles since 1977. “Back then, we thought (about climate change) in terms of generations,” she said. “Ten to 15 years ago, we were thinking in terms of decades. Now it’s in our face.”
 (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Climate change fears motivate scientist, longtime activist

They are well into their 70s and are speaking up for environmental protection in Island County.

 

Phil North is climate adaptation coordinator and conservation scientist working with the Tulalip Tribes. The tribes formed a Climate Adaptation Team in 2016. Two Natural Resources Department staff members, North and Aaron Jones, devote full time to climate issues.
Photographed on Monday, Dec. 28, 2020 in Bellingham, Washington.  (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

For tribes, climate change fight is about saving culture

The Tulalips are expanding efforts to protect land and water that are integral to their identity.

Phil North is climate adaptation coordinator and conservation scientist working with the Tulalip Tribes. The tribes formed a Climate Adaptation Team in 2016. Two Natural Resources Department staff members, North and Aaron Jones, devote full time to climate issues.
Photographed on Monday, Dec. 28, 2020 in Bellingham, Washington.  (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
The new Washington State Ferries terminal at Mukilteo on Friday, Nov. 27, 2020. (Chuck Taylor / The Herald) 20201127

You’ll be 2 feet higher when boarding the Mukilteo ferry

Sea level rise is factored into the design of the new ferry terminal and a marine research center.

The new Washington State Ferries terminal at Mukilteo on Friday, Nov. 27, 2020. (Chuck Taylor / The Herald) 20201127
A boat drives out of the Port of Everett Marina in front of Boxcar Park, which is one of the sites set to be elevated in preparation for rising sea levels on Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020 in Everett, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

How the Port of Everett is preparing for a rising sea level

Big and little changes are in the works along the north Everett shore, though they are easy to overlook.

A boat drives out of the Port of Everett Marina in front of Boxcar Park, which is one of the sites set to be elevated in preparation for rising sea levels on Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020 in Everett, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Washington State Climatologist Nick Bond. (University of Washington)

UW climate expert: We are moving into uncharted territory

State climatologist says the declining snowpack threatens water supplies as population grows.

Washington State Climatologist Nick Bond. (University of Washington)
Caption: South Whidbey High School students Annie Philp, left, and Maggie Nattress lead a climate change demonstration in Freeland on Nov. 29, 2019. The two friends are founders of United Student Leaders. (Linda LaMar)

From worriers to warriors, they’re fighting climate change

Local environmental groups are forming, growing and attracting new members, young and old.

Caption: South Whidbey High School students Annie Philp, left, and Maggie Nattress lead a climate change demonstration in Freeland on Nov. 29, 2019. The two friends are founders of United Student Leaders. (Linda LaMar)