Julie Titone

Solar panels are visible along the rooftop of the Crisp family home on Monday, Nov. 14, 2022 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Breaking it down: How consumers can cash in on federal climate bill

Tax credits and discounts on electric vehicles are among many incentives to help consumers save money and the planet.

 

Casey Katims (U.S. Climate Alliance)

Edmonds native directs U.S. Climate Alliance

In a fight to reduce greenhouse gases, Casey Katims and staff draw a roadmap for the national organization.

 

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State’s new Clean Fuel Standard takes aim at climate-changing pollution

As drafted, the standard seeks to improve air quality in high-pollution neighborhoods. Deadline to comment on them is Aug. 31.

 

Remis Jankauskas, left, and Trent Pickford of CM Heating move a heat pump into place while working on a home’s HVAC system Friday, July 15, 2022, in Woodinville, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Climate change prompts a push away from natural gas

What’s an effective way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions? Heat pumps, advocates say. And new building codes could require them.

Remis Jankauskas, left, and Trent Pickford of CM Heating move a heat pump into place while working on a home’s HVAC system Friday, July 15, 2022, in Woodinville, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Logo for news use featuring Snohomish County, Washington. 220118

A climate bill that died in Legislature lives on, in plans for future

A bill requiring cities and counties to cut greenhouse gases failed to pass, but they’re planning to do it anyway.

Logo for news use featuring Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
In this photo taken on Monday, Sept. 9, 2019, the Modular Offshore Grid with wind turbines as a background in the North Sea off of the Belgian coast. The Modular Offshore Grid is the first of its kind in Belgium and is of strategic importance for Belgium's further development of renewable energy in the North Sea. (Eric Herchaft, Pool Photo via AP)

Catching waves and wind: Clean energy search turns offshore

Marine energy has momentum in the Northwest. Up-front costs are high, but wind, wave and tidal energy are free and boundless.

In this photo taken on Monday, Sept. 9, 2019, the Modular Offshore Grid with wind turbines as a background in the North Sea off of the Belgian coast. The Modular Offshore Grid is the first of its kind in Belgium and is of strategic importance for Belgium's further development of renewable energy in the North Sea. (Eric Herchaft, Pool Photo via AP)
A quality control specialist at The Group14 Technologies in Woodinville, Washington on March 1, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
A quality control specialist at The Group14 Technologies in Woodinville, Washington on March 1, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
The massive mudslide that killed at least eight people and left dozens missing is shown in this aerial photo, Monday, March 24, 2014, near Arlington, Wash. The search for survivors grew Monday, raising fears that the death toll could climb far beyond the eight confirmed fatalities. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

After Oso disaster, landslide prediction remains vexing, necessary

Slides will become more prevalent with climate change. Scientists are scrambling to prepare.

The massive mudslide that killed at least eight people and left dozens missing is shown in this aerial photo, Monday, March 24, 2014, near Arlington, Wash. The search for survivors grew Monday, raising fears that the death toll could climb far beyond the eight confirmed fatalities. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
A car drives along a section of Ben Howard road that Snohomish County will raise due to flooding on Friday, Dec. 17, 2021 in Monroe, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Not so high and dry: Climate change adds to flooding risks

Road improvements are planned with future river flows in mind, starting with an area between Monroe and Sultan.

A car drives along a section of Ben Howard road that Snohomish County will raise due to flooding on Friday, Dec. 17, 2021 in Monroe, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Saman Shareghi is organically farming in his parents yard in Bothell. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

In climate change war, this Bothell man’s weapon is a garden

Saman Shareghi is growing a food forest. His is one of several efforts across Snohomish County.

Saman Shareghi is organically farming in his parents yard in Bothell. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Kate Lunceford has complaints of the use and treatments of trees in new construction in Bothell on October 7, 2021. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

League of Women Voters has a new mission: Defend urban trees

With a focus on climate change, the Snohomish County branch wants to preserve the urban tree canopy.

Kate Lunceford has complaints of the use and treatments of trees in new construction in Bothell on October 7, 2021. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Volunteer Megan Gossen gets ready to plant a paper birch tree for Green Everett Day at Forest Park on Saturday, Oct. 2, 2021 in Everett, Washington.  (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Trees, fighters of climate change, are also victims of it

As the weather becomes more extreme, the trees that are synonymous with Washington are suffering.

Volunteer Megan Gossen gets ready to plant a paper birch tree for Green Everett Day at Forest Park on Saturday, Oct. 2, 2021 in Everett, Washington.  (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
PUD Generation Senior Manager Brad Spangler points out a megawatt meter for one of two generators that provide power to the City of Everett at the Henry M. Jackson Hydroelectric Project on Friday, July 23, 2021 in Sultan, Wash. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

How the PUD kept things humming during the record heat wave

The public utility has been bracing for the impacts of climate change for more than a decade.

PUD Generation Senior Manager Brad Spangler points out a megawatt meter for one of two generators that provide power to the City of Everett at the Henry M. Jackson Hydroelectric Project on Friday, July 23, 2021 in Sultan, Wash. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Cars make their way across US 2 between Lake Stevens and Everett as wildfire smoke makes downtown Everett barely visible on Friday, Sept. 11, 2020. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Wildfire smoke: A burning health issue is getting worse

As the hazardous haze increases during fire seasons, it’s time to get serious and prepare, experts say.

Cars make their way across US 2 between Lake Stevens and Everett as wildfire smoke makes downtown Everett barely visible on Friday, Sept. 11, 2020. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Libby Reed, left, and Patrick Lehr, right, plant red cipollini onions at Orange Star Farm on Thursday, May 6, 2021 in Monroe, Wash.

Agencies, nonprofits help farms adapt to changing landscape

It’s not just climate that’s a challenge. Local agriculture is also fending off urban encroachment.

Libby Reed, left, and Patrick Lehr, right, plant red cipollini onions at Orange Star Farm on Thursday, May 6, 2021 in Monroe, Wash.
Libby Reed loosens soil with a broadfork at Orange Star Farm on Thursday, May 6, 2021 in Monroe, Wash. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

By necessity, local farmers grow resilient to climate change

Snohomish County’s diverse agricultural community is learning to survive a bushel of challenges.

Libby Reed loosens soil with a broadfork at Orange Star Farm on Thursday, May 6, 2021 in Monroe, Wash. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Tom Campbell, who as a legislative staffer, helped write the original 1990 Growth Management Act, stands in the  eco-friendly subdivision called Clearwater Commons on Tuesday, March 9, 2021 in Bothell, Washington. House Bill 1099, which would update Washingtonճ Growth Management Act, moves to the Senate after House approval. Campbell wants Snohomish County to move ahead with climate-friendly regulations, in parallel if not ahead of updated state law. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Bill would add climate-change factors to state planning law

Backers say HB 1099 would limit sprawl and cut greenhouse gases. Critics fear it would hurt housing options.

Tom Campbell, who as a legislative staffer, helped write the original 1990 Growth Management Act, stands in the  eco-friendly subdivision called Clearwater Commons on Tuesday, March 9, 2021 in Bothell, Washington. House Bill 1099, which would update Washingtonճ Growth Management Act, moves to the Senate after House approval. Campbell wants Snohomish County to move ahead with climate-friendly regulations, in parallel if not ahead of updated state law. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Dirt is moved during the deconstruction of a seawall on Friday, Jan. 29, 2020 in Langley, Wa. Shoreline restoration underway north of Langley involves removal of an old barge and bulkheads. Sea level rise makes such habitat improvements all the more important to endangered salmon and their prey. The project is a partnership between Seahorse Siesta property owners and the Northwest Straits Foundation. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Small fish, big barriers: A county confronts climate change

Island County has 196 miles of shoreline to protect as sea levels rise. And erosion is only one of the challenges.

Dirt is moved during the deconstruction of a seawall on Friday, Jan. 29, 2020 in Langley, Wa. Shoreline restoration underway north of Langley involves removal of an old barge and bulkheads. Sea level rise makes such habitat improvements all the more important to endangered salmon and their prey. The project is a partnership between Seahorse Siesta property owners and the Northwest Straits Foundation. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Marianne Edain, seen with her dog Takilna, is a longtime activist and, with her husband Steve Erickson, founded the Whidbey Environmental Action Network (WEAN). They are restoration ecologists by trade. Shot at home on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021 in Clinton, Washington. Edain, 73, has been fighting local environmental battles since 1977. “Back then, we thought (about climate change) in terms of generations,” she said. “Ten to 15 years ago, we were thinking in terms of decades. Now it’s in our face.”
 (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Climate change fears motivate scientist, longtime activist

They are well into their 70s and are speaking up for environmental protection in Island County.

Marianne Edain, seen with her dog Takilna, is a longtime activist and, with her husband Steve Erickson, founded the Whidbey Environmental Action Network (WEAN). They are restoration ecologists by trade. Shot at home on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021 in Clinton, Washington. Edain, 73, has been fighting local environmental battles since 1977. “Back then, we thought (about climate change) in terms of generations,” she said. “Ten to 15 years ago, we were thinking in terms of decades. Now it’s in our face.”
 (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Phil North is climate adaptation coordinator and conservation scientist working with the Tulalip Tribes. The tribes formed a Climate Adaptation Team in 2016. Two Natural Resources Department staff members, North and Aaron Jones, devote full time to climate issues.
Photographed on Monday, Dec. 28, 2020 in Bellingham, Washington.  (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

For tribes, climate change fight is about saving culture

The Tulalips are expanding efforts to protect land and water that are integral to their identity.

Phil North is climate adaptation coordinator and conservation scientist working with the Tulalip Tribes. The tribes formed a Climate Adaptation Team in 2016. Two Natural Resources Department staff members, North and Aaron Jones, devote full time to climate issues.
Photographed on Monday, Dec. 28, 2020 in Bellingham, Washington.  (Andy Bronson / The Herald)