Six homes, including this one on South Lewis Street, will be included in Saturday’s home tour put on by the Monroe Historical Society. (Ian Terry / The Herald)

Six homes, including this one on South Lewis Street, will be included in Saturday’s home tour put on by the Monroe Historical Society. (Ian Terry / The Herald)

Home and Garden calendar for Snohomish County and beyond

Green Everett Day: 9 a.m. to noon Oct. 28, Forest Park, 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd., Everett. Help plant hundreds of native trees and shrubs in Forest Park to ensure that this wooded wonderland continues to thrive. Gather family and friends to celebrate the kick-off of planting season with food and fun. More at https://everettwa.gov.

Focus on Farming: 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Nov. 1, Evergreen State Fairgrounds, 14405 179th Ave. SE, Monroe. Focus on Farming XIV: Ideas to Grow With features 24 workshop classes with six industry tracks, presented by some of the top experts in the country. Mix of topics, ideas and speakers focused on helping expand the opportunities, sustainability and economic viability of the region’s farms and forests. More at www.FocusOnFarming.org.

Hunt for junk: Are you a keen-eyed junker? The Great Junk Hunt is 6 to 9 p.m. Nov. 10 and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 11 at the Evegreen State Fairgrounds, 14405 179th Ave. SE, Monroe. The holiday flea market will be in the Gary D. Weikel Events Center, filled with 36,000 square feet of junk. It’s a gathering of vendors selling their best farmhouse, industrial, vintage and repurposed junkin’ goods. Early bird shopping tickets (Friday and Saturday) are $20; general admission (Saturday only) tickets are $8. Purchase tickets online to get in at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 10. Kids 12 and younger get in free. More at www.thegreatjunkhunt.com.

Become a master: Master gardener training classes start in January. Research, educate, mentor and answer horticulture questions for gardeners in a collaborative environment. All training is open book and no memorization is expected. Training involves about 80 hours of classroom and workshop instruction held once a week on Thursdays, Jan. 11 through March 29. Tuition is $275, plus a volunteer commitment of 40 hours each year for two years on a variety of horticultural and environmental educational projects. Without the volunteer commitment, tuition is $775. More at 425-338-2400 or http://tinyurl.com/y8srkp2y.

Fine pines: “Conifers for Year-round Interest” talk by Sandy Milam, noon to 1 p.m. Nov. 18, Evergreen Arboretum and Gardens, Legion Memorial Park, 145 Alverson Blvd., Everett. Learn about all those cone-producing plants that add interest in the garden with their color, shape and size. The class will cover planting care and selecting the right plant for the right place, including containers. Also view some of the newest introductions in the arboretum. Meet at the front entrance to the arboretum. Free. More at www.evergreenarboretum.com.

HOME TOURS

Monroe Historical Society: Tour of six homes is 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 4. The event is a fundraiser for the society to maintain its museum and keep it operating as a free attraction and resource in the community. The self-guided tour begins at the 1908 Monroe City Hall Building and Historic Museum, 207 E. Main St. The museum is the first stop. Tickets are $10. Most of the homeowners will be at their homes during the tour to answer questions about their restoration efforts. More at 360-217-7223 or www.monroe historicalsociety.org.

Holiday Home Tour: The Assistance League of Everett’s tour of homes in Mukilteo and Everett is 1 to 7 p.m. Dec. 4. Tickets are $30 in advance or $35 the day of. The tour also has tastings from local chefs, carolers, raffle baskets, a gift shop and photos with Santa. Tickets are available at Stadium Flowers in Everett and Lynnwood, Barbara’s Floral in Mukilteo, Joyworks in Snohomish and J. Matheson Gifts in Everett, as well as the league’s thrift shop, 5107 Evergreen Way, Everett. More at www.assistance leagueofeverett.org.

Snohomish Christmas Parlor Tour: Noon to 4 p.m. Dec. 10. See historic homes decorated for the holidays. Cost is $15 general admission, $12 for seniors and youth. Each ticket includes a tour map with directions to each showcased home. Buy tickets at McDaniel’s Do It Center, Joyworks and Annie’s On First in advance or at the Waltz Building the day of the tour. Call 360-568-5235 or go to www.snohomishhistoricalsociety.org.

To submit calendar items, contact Andrea Brown at 425-339-3443 or abrown@heraldnet.com.

Talk to us

More in Life

Create your own simple syrup for the best summer drinks

Try two drink recipes — a sparkling lemonade and a margarita — that call for chile lemon simple syrup.

Pinot gris continues to merit gold medals for Northwest wine

The Cascadia wine competition proves the Burgundy white grape is just as worthy of attention as ever.

With COVID-19, this is a once-in-a-century kind of summer

Though we’re in a pandemic, we can still find imaginative and resourceful ways to enjoy summertime.

Flavorful chicken salad is perfect for a hot summer night

The only cooking you need to do for this dish is toast the walnuts to enhance their flavor.

Keep masks on the kitchen counter next to your phone so you remember to grab one when you leave the house. (Jennifer Bardsley)
Household strategies to manage summer’s hottest new accessory

This mom lays out her plan to keep clean masks available to all four family members at all times.

2020 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon EcoDiesel: Don’t call it an SUV

The new engine produces 442 lb-ft of torque. Its partner is an eight-speed automatic transmission.

How Impossible’s plant-based burger meat compares to beef

Thanks to the pandemic, the plant-based meat alternative is no longer impossible to find in stores.

This summer, your table is waiting on Main Street in Edmonds

The city is closing off the street on weekends to provide a safe place for dining. Bothell is doing the same thing, but seven days a week.

Whidbey Island’s roadside red door is a portal to nowhere

The door on Cultus Bay Road has been a South Whidbey Island icon for 30 years. Here’s the story.

Most Read