Handsome styling, comfort and attractive pricing are hallmarks of the 2019 Infiniti QX60 luxury midsize SUV. (Manufacturer photo)

Handsome styling, comfort and attractive pricing are hallmarks of the 2019 Infiniti QX60 luxury midsize SUV. (Manufacturer photo)

Infiniti QX60 luxury SUV boosts safety standards for 2019

All models have blind spot warning, forward emergency braking and forward collision warning.

The Infiniti QX60 is a handsome and comfortable premium midsize SUV with three rows of seats accommodating up to seven passengers. A considerable number of safety features are standard and QX60’s pricing puts it in the bargain arena among other vehicles in its class.

For 2019 there are two trim levels, both available with front-wheel or all-wheel drive: the QX60 Pure and the QX60 Luxe.

A new Limited Package has been added to the options list for those who want to gussy-up their ride with fancier materials and trim in the cabin, dark chrome exterior trim, and unique dark 20-inch wheels.

Other new option package content includes lane departure prevention, lane departure warning, blind spot intervention and high beam assist.

Blind spot warning, forward emergency braking with pedestrian detection, and predictive forward collision warning are now standard on all models.

Base pricing, including a $995 destination charge, begins at $45,245 for a QX60 Pure with two-wheel drive. Topping off the list is the QX60 Luxe AWD, chiming in at $48,845.

All models have a 3.5-liter V6 engine and continuously variable transmission (CVT). The engine’s 295 horsepower and 270 pound-feet of torque propel the QX60 vigorously without swilling gasoline. EPA fuel economy ratings are 20 mpg city, 27 mpg highway, and 22 mpg combined. Maximum towing capacity is 5,000 pounds.

Easy to use controls, including large buttons and knobs for the infotainment and climate control systems, highlight the 2019 Infiniti QX60 interior. (Manufacturer photo)

Easy to use controls, including large buttons and knobs for the infotainment and climate control systems, highlight the 2019 Infiniti QX60 interior. (Manufacturer photo)

My tester was a front-drive QX60 Luxe model, onto which were attached six optional packages and four standalone options. The packages added every comfort, convenience, driver assist, safety, entertainment, connectivity and appearance feature available on a 2019 QX60. The standalones were premium paint, Wi-Fi, running boards and welcome lighting. These indulgences shot up the bottom line by about $20,000, but as option items they can be easily pared down if keeping a tight rein on spending is a motivator. An unembellished version of the Luxe model is still mightily equipped with standard features.

The atmosphere for passengers in the third row seat is a bit cramped, which is not unusual for midsize SUVs trying to make space for a third row. When those seats are upright, items in the rear cargo area will feel the pinch too. With third row seats folded, a vast cargo area is created and its floor is flat.

Ride and handling are quite nice, enough to make the 2019 Infiniti QX60 perform like a pro on winding roads as well as linear highways and freeways, keeping passengers safe and comfortable all the while. Standard, Sport, Snow and Eco modes let the driver customize the car’s performance to suit assorted situations, preferences and moods.

The 2019 Infiniti QX60 midsize SUV has seating for up to seven passengers across three rows of seats. (Manufacturer photo)

The 2019 Infiniti QX60 midsize SUV has seating for up to seven passengers across three rows of seats. (Manufacturer photo)

2019 INFINITI QX60

Base price, including destination charge: $46,795

Price as driven: $65,930

Mary Lowry is an independent automotive writer who lives in Snohomish County. She is a member of the Motor Press Guild, and a member and past president of the Northwest Automotive Press Association. Vehicles are provided by the manufacturers as a one-week loan for review purposes only. In no way do the manufacturers control the content of the reviews.

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