Tayla Lynn’s struggle with addiction inspires benefit concert

The granddaughter of country legend Loretta Lynn will perform July 19 at the Historic Everett Theatre.

Country singer Tayla Lynn has played benefit concerts before, but “Promise for Tomorrow” in Everett is tied to a dark time in her life.

Lynn, whose grandmother is country legend Loretta Lynn, is a recovering addict. She was eight years sober when she relapsed, taking Vicodin following the birth of her first son, Tru, via C-section in 2013.

Wracked with guilt, shame and pain, Lynn calls that six-month stretch her personal hell. But it could have been worse.

“When I did get sober again, it was so important there were people around me that supported me,” she said. “It’s so hard to do it on your own.”

Lynn’s July 19 benefit concert at the Historic Everett Theatre will help raise money for the Snohomish County Parent-Child Assistance Program.

The program, one of several under the helm of Everett-based nonprofit Pacific Treatment Alternatives, helps drug- and alcohol-dependent women and their children with treatment, recovery and housing. More than 125 families benefit from its services monthly.

“This is something that is near and dear to my heart,” Lynn said. “Any time we can shine the light on recovery and alcoholism, I think it’s important.”

Debbie Graham, executive director of Pacific Treatment Alternatives — formerly known as Safe Babies, Safe Moms — says the program is invaluable for families struggling with addiction: more than 90 percent of the mothers enrolled complete drug and alcohol programs.

“Many of our moms go back to school so they can become self-sufficient,” Graham said. “We really work hard at reuniting and keeping families together.”

Tayla Lynn will perform at a benefit concert for a program that helps families struggling with addiction in Snohomish County. (Michael Jenkins)

Tayla Lynn will perform at a benefit concert for a program that helps families struggling with addiction in Snohomish County. (Michael Jenkins)

Graham said the concert goal is to raise between $15,000 and $20,000. Proceeds will go toward an emergency shelter that will house families for up to 90 days.

Lynn, 41, of Hurricane Mills, Tennessee, was living in the Bellevue area when she heard about PCAP. She asked the organization if she could help by singing.

“I was just blown away by what they were doing,” Lynn said. “I just begged them to let me be part of it.”

Lynn grew up watching her grandmother — who was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1988 — play on the road. She’s gone on tour with Loretta Lynn on and off since she was 18.

Tayla Lynn found the limelight as a singer for the country band Stealing Angels, which produced two Billboard-charting songs, “He Better Be Dead” and “Paper Heart.”

Lynn, who now tours with her own band, the Jelly Rollers, will sing a mix of her grandmother’s biggest hits, such as “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” “You Ain’t Woman Enough” and “Honky Tonk Girl,” as well as original music from her upcoming album, “Love, Mama.”

The record, named in honor of her late mother, Cindy Plemons, includes a tribute to Loretta Lynn, “She’s the Blue in My Eyes,” as well as the soon-to-be released single, “Sunset in Seattle.”

Lynn also plans to share her own story of addiction during the performance.

“It’s going to be fun, but heartfelt,” she said.

Evan Thompson: 425-339-3427, ethompson@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @ByEvanThompson.

If you go

Tayla Lynn, granddaughter of country legend Loretta Lynn, performs a benefit concert, “Promise for Tomorrow,” at 7 p.m. July 19 at the Historic Everett Theatre, 2911 Colby Ave., Everett. Tickets are $20-$25. Purchase them at www.eventbrite.com or by calling 425-258-6766.

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