Community Extra: Applause

Students from Lake Stevens and Brier recently worked a week in Olympia as pages in the state Senate.

Nathaniel Lugg served as a page for Sen. Val Stevens, R-Arlington. Stephanie McDaniel was sponsored by Sen. Rosemary McAuliffe, D-Bothell.

“Meeting the governor was the most memorable moment of paging,” Stephanie said.

Stephanie, daughter of Diane and Barry Swanberg of Brier, is a home-schooled freshman. She enjoys hanging out with her friends and volunteering at the public library.

A freshman at Grace Academy High School, Nathaniel, 15, is the son of Timothy and Renee Lugg of Lake Stevens. Nathaniel’s favorite part of paging was working on the Senate floor, watching the floor action and meeting some of the senators, he said.

Pages spend two hours each day in page school learning about the legislative process and parliamentary procedure. To augment their studies, pages write their own bills to present at a mock hearing. For his project, Nathaniel drafted a bill to provide educational vouchers to students who attend private schools.

Nathaniel is a member of his school’s Student Leadership Council.

The Totem Girl Scout Council in Snohomish County plans to recognize its volunteers Sunday as part of Girl Scout Leadership Day.

More than 1,000 volunteers give their time and talents to provide programs, activities and community service project direction for the 3,350 girls in the 10 Girl Scout service areas of Snohomish County.

Service unit manager volunteers in Snohomish County include Lake Stevens Service Unit 210, Amy Scofield; Marysville Service Unit 211, Dawn Hughes and Ken Young; Stanwood-Camano Service Unit 212, Kim Gangloff; Mukilteo Service Unit 220, Deb Christopher; South Everett Service Unit 222, Leslie de Rham; Snohomish Service Unit 223, Kari Fausey; North Everett Service Unit 224, Tina Fish; Monroe Service Unit 225, Elaine Thaete; Edmonds Service Unit 240, Terri Pena; Lynnwood Service Unit 241, Linda Wold and Kathy Edmonson.

To volunteer with Girl Scouts, call 877-822-9435 or e-mail terrlh@girlscoutstotem.org.

Totem Council Girl Scout Service Unit 224 of North Everett finished the recent cooking-selling season by sending off 1,000 boxes of cookies to Operation Cookie Drop, which sends cookies to military men and women serving overseas.

The unit’s top sellers of the season were Molly Hysmith, Morissa White and Emma Kate Ramsey of Troop 2141, and Cassidy Fish and Chandler Fish of Troop 324. All have earned their ways to summer camp.

The 108 girls in the 11 troops in Service Unit 224 sold more than 24,000 boxes of cookies and the troops earned more $14,000 to be used for activities, field trips, camping opportunities and service projects.

North Everett Girl Scout leaders said those who buy cookies help the Scouts develop a range of skills, including leadership, money management, decision-making, customer service, planning, goal setting, teamwork and public speaking.

Along with Operation Cookie Drop, troops also give donated cookies to food banks, foster care groups, hospitals, police and fire departments, senior citizens and schools.

Volunteers at the Sky Valley Food Bank in Monroe are to be honored during National Volunteer Week.

Volunteers at the food bank work six days a week, picking up, loading, repackaging, distributing and delivering more than 30,000 meals a month, as well as logging hours volunteering for administrative and clerical projects.

In 2006, the food bank’s volunteers worked nearly 12,000 hours and handled more than 500,000 pounds of donated and purchased food. The volunteers will receive pins and goodie bags during the celebration week at the Sky Valley Food Bank.

The Golden K Kiwanis Club of Everett recently made a food bank donation of 700 pounds of food and $255.

The food and cash donations were collected at the Madison Street Albertsons store in Everett.

The nonprofit organization Choice &Consequence has received an $18,000 grant from The Everett Clinic Foundation.

The donation goes to help tell “The Real Inside Story,” which uses human organs to illustrate the damaging effects of alcohol, tobacco and other drug abuse on internal organs.

The grant will help provide information and services to young people in 40 Snohomish County schools.

For information about the grant or how to donate to the organization, call 360-435-7250 or go online to www.choiceandconsequence.org.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Edmonds Arts Festival, longtime art supporters Dr. Richard and Edwina Baxter and Ron and Michelle Clyborne have offered a challenge to other arts supporters in Edmonds.

A challenge grant, sponsored by the couples, matches every $50 donation to the Edmonds Art Festival Foundation with an additional $50 until the total of all contributions reaches $5,000

The “50 for 50” matching challenge will accept donations until June 1. All donations are tax-deductible and donors will receive a confirmation of donation for tax purposes. All contributors of $50 increments will be recognized as “50 for 50” patrons at the 50th Anniversary Celebration Preview Party on June 14.

Checks can be sent to EAFF 50 for 50, P.O. Box 699, Edmonds, WA 98020. Note the “50 for 50” program on your check.

Support 7 and the Snohomish County Chapter of the American Red Cross work together to provide emergency services to residents of Snohomish County. Their team efforts were recognized during a Red Cross disaster services gathering April 9 at the Red Cross Chapter House in Everett.

Ken Gaydos, representing Support 7 chaplains, accepted a commendation from Coni Conner, Red Cross director of disaster services.

The Red Cross’ mission is to help people prevent, prepare for and respond to emergencies and to assist victims of disaster with emergency needs such as food, clothing and shelter.

Support 7 is a corps of volunteer nondenominational chaplains available to emergency service personnel and their families and who provide physical, emotional and spiritual care to those who experience sudden events of crisis.

Three annual Snohomish events recently received special awards at the 2007 Washington Festival and Events Summit in Walla Walla.

Awards were given for the 2006 Home for the Holidays promotional poster created by Julie Myrfors; the 2006 Festival of Pumpkins promotional brochure designed by Denise Foster of JMJ Printing; and the 2006 Inaugural Groundfrog Day Celebration organized by the Snohomish Chamber of Commerce, Historic Downtown Snohomish, Snohomish City Economic Development Committee and the Lions, Kiwanis and Tillicum Kiwanis clubs of Snohomish.

Instead of requesting a bunch of presents, Andrew Spangler asked that a donation be made to the Lake Stevens Community Food Bank in celebration of his 10th birthday. The food bank recently received a gift of $110 in Andrew’s name.

The food bank has joined the Feinstein Foundation Million-Dollar Challenge to fight hunger. Any contributions, such as the one from Andrew, made to the Lake Stevens Community Food Bank in April help earn matching funds from the foundation. The food bank will receive a portion of the $1 million giveaway based on donations received.

All donations through April 30, including cash, checks and food items, will be counted. For more information, call 425-334-3430.

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