Sylvi performs at the Schack Art Center during the first night of Fisherman’s Village Music Festival on Thursday in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Sylvi performs at the Schack Art Center during the first night of Fisherman’s Village Music Festival on Thursday in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Everett music fest draws hometown and visiting artists

The Fisherman’s Village Music Festival is underway with about 50 bands and artists performing at six venues.

EVERETT — A sunset on Hoyt Avenue in downtown Everett made the walls of the Schack Art Center glow golden as the voice of Sarah Feinberg reverberated through the gallery.

The local singer-songwriter — who uses the stage name Sylvi — sang and played guitar for the packed gallery Thursday night, in front of paintings that hung on the wall behind her. One depicted a golden sky, and another featured a mountain. The contrast in their imagery felt right as a backdrop for the Southern California transplant who moved to Snohomish County as a young girl, bringing the beach with her in her long, sandy blonde hair. Fields of tulips in both paintings matched the singer’s red cowboy boots as she tapped her toes to the beat.

Sylvi was one of the first of about 50 artists and bands who are performing this week in Everett’s three-day-long Fisherman’s Village Music Festival.

From indie rock to soul music, to 12 food trucks and dozens of vendors at the festival’s night market, the event has something to offer everybody. Festival organizer Ryan Crowther said the night market is a new addition this year, noting that it is also open to those who do not purchase tickets to the festival.

People wait for Sylvi to perform at the Schack Art Center during the first night of Fisherman’s Village Music Festival on Thursday in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

People wait for Sylvi to perform at the Schack Art Center during the first night of Fisherman’s Village Music Festival on Thursday in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

The annual festival had its inaugural year in 2014. Seven years later, the event has filled stages at six venues for three nights of music Sept. 9-11.

“It’s just a great weekend. Ryan does a great job of curating the lineups,” Feinberg said. “The festival has such a community aspect of bringing people together and sharing music. It feels so awesome to get to go just a few blocks from my house and get that experience.”

Joelle Grinspan, 33, was among the crowd who watched Sylvi play Thursday night. The Everett native has been to every Fisherman’s fest since its creation. Grinspan said she enjoys the event because she always discovers new bands at the festival she wouldn’t ever know about otherwise.

In Grinspan’s eyes, this year’s festival is extra special, because last year was cancelled due to the pandemic.

“It feels like a big reunion after 18 months apart,” she said.

This year’s headlining band, Built to Spill, hails from Boise, Idaho. The band is scheduled to play at 8:45 p.m. Saturday night on the main stage near the intersection of Wetmore and Pacific avenues.

People gather inside the Schack Art Center during the first night of the Fisherman’s Village Music Festival to watch Sylvi perform. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

People gather inside the Schack Art Center during the first night of the Fisherman’s Village Music Festival to watch Sylvi perform. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Band front man Doug Martsch said Saturday night’s set will feature songs from several albums in the band’s discography — a nod to longtime fans and a good introduction for first-time listeners.

The indie group was formed by Martsch in 1992. They produced two independent albums — “Ultimate Alternative Wavers” (1993) and “There’s Nothing Wrong with Love” (1994)before signing a record deal with Warner Bros. in 1995.

Martsch said he never expected his life to go the way it did, allowing him to make a career out of playing music. Despite his success, the musician has always approached his art with a striking humility. He tends to keep his interactions with crowds minimal, he said, because banter with the audience can “open up a can of worms.”

“Early on, I decided I was mostly going to keep my mouth shut,” Martsch said in a phone interview. “I felt at some point that it was too easy to say stuff, to have people laugh at any joke you told. It felt too weird.”

In 2006, music writer Eric Grandy praised the indie rock group’s absence of mystique in a piece he wrote for The Stranger.

“Built to Spill’s unassuming nature — their lack of rock-star fiction — is a big part of their charm,” Grandy wrote. “Their songs are resonant, but without specific meaning, so everything’s open to interpretation. Their live performances are powerful, but without spectacle.”

On Saturday night, Martsch will play guitar and sing with a three-piece lineup he formed in 2019 — Melanie Radford on bass and Teresa Cruces on drums. It will be the band’s first time playing in Everett, and they’re excited, Martsch said.

If you go

Fisherman’s Village Music Festival, hosted by the Everett Music Initiative, is taking place Sept. 9-11. Festival wristbands are $85. Single-day tickets for Friday and Saturday are also available for $40. More information can be found at thefishermansvillage.com.

Ellen Dennis: 425-339-3486; edennis@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @reporterellen

Talk to us

More in Local News

Snohomish County Jail. (Sue Misao / Herald file)
As omicron surges, frustrations and challenges mount in correction facilities

More than 10% of those in state prisons are infected. “We’re kind of in this Twilight Zone cycle,” one prisoner said.

The Washington National Guard arrived Friday at Providence Regional Medical Center Everett to help with a surge of COVID-19 cases at the hospital. (Providence) 20220121
State offers free home tests; National Guard arrives in Everett

Supply is limited at a new online portal, but Washingtonians can now order five free rapid COVID tests.

vote
Ballots sent for special election on public schools’ funding

Levies to pay for staff, programs, computers and capital projects are on the Feb. 8 ballot across Snohomish County.

FILE - Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson talks to reporters, Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, during a news conference in Seattle. In a 5-4 decision Thursday, Jan. 20, 2022, the Washington Supreme Court upheld an $18 million campaign finance penalty against the Consumer Brands Association, formerly known as the Grocery Manufacturers Association. Ferguson sued the group in 2013, alleging that it spent $11 million to oppose a ballot initiative without registering as a political committee or disclosing the source of the money. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Washington justices uphold $18M fine in GMO-labeling case

Big grocers funneled dark money into a campaign against genetically modified labels on food packaging.

Closing this bedroom door during an apartment fire in Everett helped contain flames, smoke and carbon monoxide, firefighters say. (Everett Fire Department) 20220120
Crucial move during Everett fire: Closing the bedroom door

Two residents were rescued from a bedroom at the Riverdale Apartments. In all, three were injured.

Judge: Sex abuse of former Marysville student violated law

A woman sued the district last year, accusing a longtime art teacher of sexual abuse in the 1980s.

Police respond in downtown Everett after a man collapsed with a gunshot wound Nov. 27, 2021. He later died. (Caleb Hutton / Herald file)
Everett police continue to investigate November killing

Jerome Burnett, 48, died at the hospital. A suspect fled, according to police.

Connie L. Bigelow at her store Miniatures & More in Edmonds on Tuesday. (Janice Podsada / The Herald)
Woman who lit her own Edmonds doll store on fire gets house arrest

Connie Bigelow, 54, was sentenced Friday in federal court for lighting her business on fire to collect insurance money.

People across Snohomish County share their thoughts on two years of life during the pandemic. 20220123
Anxious, weary, hopeful: How we’re coping with COVID

The pandemic has taken a toll in Snohomish County, where the first U.S. case was confirmed. Here’s a time capsule of life in 2022.

Most Read