A woman holds a sign that depicts a pro-abortion rights version of the Gadsden flag during Snohomish County’s “Bans Off Our Bodies” rally Saturday, May 14, 2022, outside the county courthouse in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

A woman holds a sign that depicts a pro-abortion rights version of the Gadsden flag during Snohomish County’s “Bans Off Our Bodies” rally Saturday, May 14, 2022, outside the county courthouse in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Everett rally draws 400-plus abortion rights supporters

Saturday’s rally was part of “Bans Off Our Bodies” protests in response to the impending overturn of Roe v. Wade.

EVERETT — The mood was festive yet serious for about 450 people at Saturday’s pro-abortion rights rally at the Snohomish County Courthouse plaza.

Music played, signs waved and speakers didn’t mince words in a united front at the “Bans Off Our Bodies” rally.

Many cities nationwide mobilized Saturday in reaction to the leaked draft opinion suggesting that Supreme Court justices are poised to overturn Roe v. Wade.

“We are here to not go backwards in time, to keep moving forward and to make sure our health and choices are protected,” said Nai Eller of Marysville, joined by her daughter and two teen friends.

Over 100 people gathered at a rally earlier this month outside the Everett courthouse in support of abortion access and reproductive freedom. Both events were organized by Snohomish County Indivisible. Over 600 people signed up to attend Saturday’s rally, said Naomi Dietrich, founder of the progressive group’s local chapter.

About a dozen speakers took the stage at Saturday’s rally attended by people of all ages.

“My entire adult life, I’ve only known safe abortions, … That will change. … That is what is at stake coming up here this summer,” Snohomish County Councilmember Megan Dunn told the crowd.

A decision to strike down Roe v. Wade would undo federal protection of abortion rights in place since 1973. Abortion access is explicitly protected by law in 16 states, including Washington.

“I want to protect women’s rights. That my little sister has this right, that I have this right, and all the coming generations have this right,” said Bailee Eller, 14, of Marysville.

Suzanne McGlynn of Shoreline was among those donning a pink “pussy” hat from protests against Donald Trump’s inauguration.

“I feel like it’s a war on women,” she said. “Everybody says it’s about babies and it’s not.”

Shelley Dishman of Granite Falls brought her granddaughter, Maddy, 5.

“She is going to have fewer rights than I had, that my mother fought for me,” Dishman said. “I look at her and my heart breaks for her.”

It was a busy day for the duo. Maddy played in a youth football game before the rally. She changed out of her “Chargers” uniform and danced around at the rally in a tutu skirt. The nearby Imagine Children’s Museum was the next stop.

Meanwhile, a man carrying an anti-abortion sign at the rally was outnumbered about 450 to 1.

Andrea Brown: 425-339-3443; abrown@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @reporterbrown.

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