Brad and Linda Guilford chat as they walk along the pedestrian path set up around the new Mukilteo ferry dock construction. The Guilfords live on the hill above the construction and walk daily to observe the progress. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Brad and Linda Guilford chat as they walk along the pedestrian path set up around the new Mukilteo ferry dock construction. The Guilfords live on the hill above the construction and walk daily to observe the progress. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Take a walk on the work-in-progress Mukilteo waterfront

A path lets pedestrians enjoy the sights and sounds of rising ferry terminal, the mountains and more.

MUKILTEO — The construction of the new Mukilteo ferry terminal is slow, costly and noisy.

But there’s a perk for pedestrians.

They have a walking path, with a breeze, salty air and the sweet sounds of progress.

A flat gravel path cuts through the area between the railroad tracks and work zones. Fences on both sides create a lane, offering a front-row view to the excavators and other heavy equipment.

“Trains, planes, eagles, ferries, people. It’s always an interesting walk,” Boeing retiree Brian Purves said Thursday afternoon.

“This walk has a big sky and the mountains couldn’t be any prettier than they are today.”

Washington State Ferries spokeswoman Diana Rhodes said the path has stayed open by popular demand.

“There are people who walk it every single day,” Rhodes said. “During the snow it was still kept open. The contractor wanted to keep it clear because they can see that a lot of people are using it.”

IMCO General Construction was awarded the contract on the passenger building, holding lanes, toll plaza and waterfront promenade. It was the lowest bidder at $49.7 million. Work began last month.

The pedestrian path was along the waterfront at one point, but had to be moved inland for this stage of construction. The fenced stretch is one-third of a mile long. It starts at the Sound Transit roundabout and ends at the Mount Baker crossing. Many walkers incorporate Lighthouse Park, sidestreets, Edgewater Beach and other areas into their routine.

For David Haynes, Thursday’s walk included stopping at Ivar’s for his grandson to get an ice cream cone about halfway through their loop.

Haynes bring his golden retriever on the path several times a week. “We like to walk here and on the Everett waterfront,” he said.

Purves likes watching the changes in the construction landscape.

“It’s hard to imagine that will be the ferry terminal,” Purves said.

The new terminal is expected to open in 2020, with a waterfront promenade to stroll.

Andrea Brown: abrown@heraldnet.com; 425-339-3443. Twitter @reporterbrown.

Where it is

To reach the trail from the existing ferry terminal, walk south on Park Avenue and follow the Sound Transit sidewalk along the railroad. Enter the path along the south (railroad) side of the site from the entrance on the Sound Transit roundabout.

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