Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is seen here signing the measure that banned bump stocks into law in March 2018, at the Capitol in Olympia. Now the state will offer a buy-back program for the devices. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file)

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is seen here signing the measure that banned bump stocks into law in March 2018, at the Capitol in Olympia. Now the state will offer a buy-back program for the devices. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file)

With money in hand, state set to buy up banned bump stocks

Owners can get $150 for each one, but they must surrender them before federal ban kicks in March 26.

OLYMPIA — A new law clears the way for the Washington State Patrol to buy up outlawed bump stocks for $150 apiece in Marysville this weekend.

Gov. Jay Inslee signed Senate Bill 5954 to provide the state patrol with $150,000 to carry out the program lawmakers created last year but failed to fund.

But owners must act fast. The opportunity will end March 26 when a federal ban on the firearm attachments takes effect.

Until then, the new law allows Washington residents to turn in up to five bump stocks, which replace the standard stock and grip of a semi-automatic firearm and will allow a gun to fire rapidly as the recoil “bumps” the trigger. It doesn’t matter if they work or not.

Owners can take them to any of the state patrol’s eight district offices between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday or Sunday. The offices will also conduct buy backs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 24 and 25.

The state patrol office in Marysville is located at 2700 116th Street NE.

People can also turn them in to their local police department, sheriff’s office or federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives by March 26. They must get a receipt and provide it to the Washington State Patrol.

Each Washington resident who surrenders one will get a voucher for $150. Once the voucher is processed, a check will be mailed to them. No checks will be written at the time a bump stock is handed in.

Once the $150,000 is spent, no more funds will be available.

Washington lawmakers banned the manufacture and sale of bump stocks in 2018 and made it illegal to own or possess them as of July.

They took action after the October 2017 mass slaying in Las Vegas, in which the shooter reportedly had 12 rifles outfitted with the plastic attachments.

Senate Bill 5954 passed unanimously in the Senate and on a 94-4 vote in the House.

Jerry Cornfield: 360-352-8623; jcornfield@herald net.com. Twitter: @dospueblos.

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