Members of the Tulalip Tribes on Friday perform a blessing and acknowledgment at the dedication of the replacement bronze plaque for the 1855 treaty between local tribes and the U.S. government in Mukilteo. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Members of the Tulalip Tribes on Friday perform a blessing and acknowledgment at the dedication of the replacement bronze plaque for the 1855 treaty between local tribes and the U.S. government in Mukilteo. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Mukilteo ceremony dedicates replica of stolen treaty plaque

The focus Friday was moving forward, with respect to a past deemed as unjust, as exemplified by the 1855 Treaty of Point Elliott.

MUKILTEO — The world has changed since 1930, when a plaque was installed by a group of white women to mark an 1855 treaty between local tribes and the U.S. government.

But for the 40 or so people of various backgrounds gathered Friday at the site of the Treaty of Point Elliott, the focus was on starting a discussion to move forward with respect to a past deemed as unjust.

Tulalip Tribes members did a drum session and blessing at the event to dedicate a new plaque. The mayor spoke. There was a lot of handshaking and photos on the sunny afternoon near where crowds would soon gather for the opening of the city’s Lighthouse Festival.

The original marker was stolen two years ago at which time the monument, at Third Street and Lincoln Avenue, was sprayed with graffiti that read “BROKEN TREATIES.”

It has stayed blank since.

Mukilteo Mayor Joe Marine, who took office this year, ordered a replica plaque, with the original wording that wasn’t controversial 92 years ago.

“We can’t rewrite history,” Marine told The Daily Herald. “We can make new history. We can right wrongs. But it’s not right to go back and change the history.”

The monument was erected in 1930 by the Marcus Whitman Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

“Basically, you learn from the past,” Teri Lynn Scott, DAR spokesperson, said before the event. “They only knew what they knew. If this starts a conversation instead of an argument, that would be best.”

She also spoke at the event.

Tony Hatch on Friday reads the replacement bronze plaque for the 1855 treaty between local tribes and the U.S. government before the scheduled dedication in Mukilteo. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Tony Hatch on Friday reads the replacement bronze plaque for the 1855 treaty between local tribes and the U.S. government before the scheduled dedication in Mukilteo. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Tulalip Tribes Chair Teri Gobin told of the importance of the waterfront area that has since become prime real estate.

“This is the homeland territories of our people. This is where our people lived from time immemorial. And this is where we gathered from the different tribes,” she said.

Gobin said the tribes want to work with city officials on future projects. Tribal leaders were not asked for input on rewording the new plaque.

“It’s just replacing it as history,” Gobin said, “because the story we are going to tell will be a lot longer than this.”

The original plaque has not been recovered.

Nathan Fabia, a Mukilteo police spokesperson, said the case was investigated, but had been inactivated pending any leads or further information.

There is a camera by the new marker.

Andrea Brown: 425-339-3443; abrown@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @reporterbrown.

Talk to us

More in Local News

King County map logo
Tribal members dance to start an assemble on the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation and Orange Shirt Day Friday evening at Tulalip Gathering Hall in Tulalip, Washington on September 30, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
‘Still here’: Tulalip boarding school descendants celebrate resilience

On Orange Shirt Day, a national day of remembrance, the Tulalip Tribes honored those who suffered due to violent cultural suppression.

Councilmember Megan Dunn, left, stands next to County Executive Dave Somers as he presents his 2023 budget proposal to her, Councilmember Nate Nehring and Councilmember Sam Low. (Snohomish County)
As County Council begins budget talks, here’s how you can weigh in.

Department heads will make their pitches in the next few days. Residents will get a say at a forum and two hearings this month

Representative Rick Larsen speaks at the March For Our Lives rally on Saturday, June 11, 2022 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Larsen to hold community meeting in Everett on Monday

The veteran Democratic lawmaker will address recent legislation passed by Congress and other topics.

Everett
Everett gets state Auditor’s Office stewardship award

State Auditor Pat McCarthy presented the award during the most recent Everett City Council meeting.

Toggle’s Bottle Shop is closed permanently on Monday, Oct. 3, 2022, in downtown Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Citing landlord dispute, Toggle’s closes in downtown Everett

The popular taproom shuttered Sunday. “Everett needs a cooperative landlord-tenant relationship in the commercial district,” a co-owner said.

Community Transit chief financial officer Eunjoo Greenhouse
Community Transit hires King County staffer as CFO

Eunjoo Greenhouse is set to join the agency Oct. 24 after years in King County government.

(Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest - US Forest Service)
U.S. 2 reopens east of Index as Bolt Creek wildfire moves north

The highway was blocked off earlier this week as the fire spread.

FILE - Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., speaks during a news conference the vote to codify Roe v. Wade, in this May 5, 2022 file photo on Capitol Hill in Washington. Murray is one of the U.S. Senate's most powerful members and seeking a sixth term. She is being challenged by Tiffany Smiley, a Republican from Pasco, Wash. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
Providence continues to face questions about hospital debt collection

The hospital group has pushed back against the notion that Providence “intentionally takes advantage of those who are vulnerable.”

Most Read