Stanwood city staff think a spur on the west end of town could disburse traffic away from downtown. Corridor A is one idea being considered. (City of Stanwood)

Stanwood city staff think a spur on the west end of town could disburse traffic away from downtown. Corridor A is one idea being considered. (City of Stanwood)

Could a bypass clear highway traffic in downtown Stanwood?

The connection would skirt west of downtown from Highway 532 north toward Old Pacific Highway.

Stanwood leaders want to free downtown from traffic that’s just passing through.

One solution they’re considering: a bypass.

After evaluating how traffic moves around and in downtown, as well as where it comes from and goes, city staff think a spur on the west end of town could disperse those drivers. Roundabouts at each end of the bypass linking Highway 532 to the northern city limits also could be part of the project.

Doing so would take at least 10 years, maybe 20, and cost millions of dollars to acquire property for the new north-south link.

But city leaders say it’s the best option to address population growth in the area and the subsequent traffic that stems from so many drivers.

“While increased traffic causes driver frustration, it also brings economic vitality to a community,” reads a city news release about a survey related to the idea. “The question becomes: how to manage traffic while promoting economic development and preserving community identity…”

Five options for a north-south spur from Highway 532 were presented in an online open house that ran between June and July. Each design connects with Highway 532 west of downtown and east of Lovers Road, north through existing agricultural land, across a rail line, and links to 102nd Avenue NW, also called Old Pacific Highway.

Survey results from the open house were not available but Community Development Director Patricia Love said staff expect to present it to the Stanwood City Council on Sept. 13.

A 2020 traffic study by the city showed about 20% of daily traffic on Highway 532 goes north along 102nd Avenue NW of Pioneer Highway.

The Washington State Department of Transportation estimated that 15,000 vehicles used Highway 532 in the heart of Stanwood every day in 2020.

The city wants to alleviate some of its worst traffic along Highway 532 between 98th Drive NW and 103rd Drive NW, with particular backups near 102nd Avenue NW/Old Pacific Highway.

Staff hope the bypass, if built, would pull traffic out of and around downtown, freeing the area of frequent gridlock, especially along 102nd Avenue NW, which becomes Old Pacific Highway north of downtown.

With that traffic gone, it would let Stanwood redesign downtown into a walkable center with wide sidewalks, walking trails and bike paths.

As part of the project, a consulting firm considered designs for buffered bike lanes, either adjacent to parking or a two-way cycle track, between the two roundabouts on Highway 532.

Have a question? Call 425-339-3037 or email streetsmarts@heraldnet.com. Please include your first and last name and city of residence.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Everett
Man shot at Everett apartment

The man in his 30s was shot Sunday night. No arrests had been made.

Logo for news use featuring the municipality of Lake Stevens in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Motorcyclist identified in fatal crash near Lake Stevens

Anthony Palko, 33, died Monday night after colliding with a passenger car. The juveniles in the car were taken to the hospital.

Marysville
Police: Marysville man shot sword-wielding roommate in self-defense

The roommates were arguing over eBay sales, according to police. Then one of them allegedly brandished a two-foot sword.

Logo for news use featuring the municipality of Lake Stevens in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Everett boy, 12, identified as Davies Beach drowning victim

Malachi Bell was one of three swimmers in distress Sunday in Lake Stevens. He did not survive.

Everett
Port of Everett hosting annual open house after pandemic hiatus

Also, Rustic Cork Wine Bar plans to open a second shop at Fisherman’s Harbor — the latest addition to the port’s “wine walk.”

Arlington Public Works employees use The Big Sidewalk Sucker to lift a concrete panel from the sidewalk. The device saves the city some money and time to level ground below the concrete. (Arlington Public Works)
This thing sucks and helps repair sidewalks in Arlington

Public works crews can remove heavy concrete panels from sidewalks, so the ground underneath can be restored.

New LGI Homes on Thursday, May 12, 2022 in Sultan, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Red-hot housing market cools, a bit, in Snohomish County

The amount of housing inventory is rising. Demand is slowing. Higher mortgage rates are a cause.

John McKeon stands in front of a mobile headquarters vehicle while discussing the funding needs of Snohomish County Volunteer Search and Rescue on Wednesday, June 22, 2022, at the search and rescue headquarters in Snohomish, Washington. McKeon said a priority for the group is to find money for new covered parking for a number of vehicles that do not have a garage to be parked in. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Snohomish County Volunteer Search and Rescue wants rescuing

They’re asking for nearly $1 million in federal recovery dollars, but funding has been hard to come by.

Mike Kersey with Aiya Moore, daughter of Christina Anderson, right, talk about the condition of Nick’s Place in Everett, Washington on June 17, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
‘We’re all good people when we get clean and sober’

Who has fentanyl taken from us? A messenger who saved lives. A “street mom.” A grandpa who loved his grandkids “999 trillion times.”

Most Read